Criminal Law for

Drug Lawyers

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit.

Lawyers for Drug Charges

The US government classifies illegal drugs/narcotics according to schedule classes that range from I to V. If you or your loved one is found to be in possession of an illegal drug or even a legal drug without a prescription, you risk facing criminal drug charges.

As soon as you suspect that you have been charged with any drug-related crime, consider contacting one of our experienced lawyers for drug charges to take control of the situation.

Typically, the severity of drug charges pressed against you will depend on the type of drug, the amount in possession, and whether you have been suspected of manufacturing, distributing, trafficking, or fraudulently obtaining it with a prescription.

Schedule I drugs generally carry severe charges while Schedule V drugs carry the least charges. Some of the common schedule I drugs include heroin, cocaine, non-medical marijuana, LSD, and Ecstasy.

Schedule I drugs are prohibited from being distributed and sold in pharmacies because they are labeled as having a high tendency for abuse. Schedule II drugs include opiates while Schedule III, IV, and V drugs are usually available in specific dosages prescribed by doctors or pharmacists.

Common Types of Drug Crime Charges

Federal and state laws in the United States cover a wide range of drug crimes. In some cases, state laws are narrower to avoid conflict with federal drug laws. If you have been charged with a drug crime, talking to an attorney for drug trafficking cases will help you understand the magnitude of the problem that awaits you.
In this section, we provide you with a quick overview of some of the common types of drug crimes.

Possession of drug paraphernalia

Drug paraphernalia is used to describe any equipment used to prepare, inhale, inject, or conceal illegal drugs. It may also be used to refer to any equipment used to produce drugs.

It is against the law for anyone to import, sell, or export any type of drug paraphernalia. Common examples of drug paraphernalia include bongs, syringes, rolling papers, and pipes.

Drug possession

This is one of the most common drug crime offenses. Being in possession of any controlled substance is a criminal offense punishable under federal and state laws. Most arrests are usually made under local drug laws.

Possession can mean having the drugs on you (in a pocket or bag, for example) or having access to and control over a place where controlled substances were found (a locker, for example).

It is good to note that if you have been accused of being in possession of illegal drugs, the state or federal government doesn’t have to prove that you are actually using the substance to charge you

Drug trafficking/distribution

Drug trafficking and distribution laws make it illegal to import, transport, and sell illegal substances such as cocaine and heroin. As a felony, drug trafficking can be a serious crime because it involves transportation of large amounts of illicit drugs.

If convicted of drug trafficking, the sentence can be anything between three years in prison to life imprisonment.

Dealing

Drug dealing is a term used to refer to the selling of illegal drugs on a smaller scale. Drug trafficking and dealing may be defined differently from state to state and under federal law. The punishment for drug dealing is usually less severe than drug trafficking.

Penalties for Committing Drug Crimes

The penalties for drug offenses tend to vary widely from one state to another. Any plea to a drug-related crime can lead to hefty fines plus several years of imprisonment. For instance, being found in possession of 50grams of cocaine can easily result in a sentence of up to five years in prison plus a fine of up to $250,000.

Generally, the penalty for committing a drug crime will depend on factors such as the type of drug, the type of drug crime charged with, the quantity of the drug, the extent of the defendant’s participation in the crime, and the defendant’s criminal record.

Apart from hefty fines and jail terms, individuals convicted of drug crimes can also be forced to undergo mandatory treatment, forfeit property, and a probation period. Have you or your loved one been charged with a drug crime? Keep in mind that it is critical to hire a lawyer for drug charges to help you fight your charge.

Contact us today and let us help you find the right legal representation you deserve.

Contact us today and let us help you find the right legal representation you deserve.

Charged with a Drug Crime?
Contact a Drug Crime Defense Attorney Now!

Have you or your loved one been charged with a drug crime? Contact an experienced attorney for drug trafficking cases to help you fight your charge. Remember the fact that fighting any drug crime charge is not an easy task, and the faster you act, the better.

We are here to help you find an experienced drug lawyer that will carefully review charges pressed against you and candidly explain the possible outcomes of your case.

At Legal Giant, we shall help you find professional drug crime lawyers who know how to handle criminal proceedings even when they become complicated. Our team of experts understands that you need a competent attorney who can manage circumstances surrounding your drug case effectively while protecting your constitutional rights, such as the right to be free from unreasonable search and seizure.

Articles About Criminal Law

insurance attorney

Can I Sue My Insurance Company for Denying My Claim?

Most of us can agree that dealing with insurance companies can be frustrating. Since they are in business and want to make a profit, they will look for any excuse to deny your claim or pay out the minimum possible amount of money in compensation. When they deny or undervalue your damage, they will try

Read More »
divorce

How Are Property and Debt Divided During Divorce?

Dividing family property during divorce can be difficult, especially if there are significant assets such as retirement and pension plans, homes, closely-held family businesses, rental property, brokerage accounts, deferred compensation, etc. Deciding who should get what at the end of the marriage can be quite tricky even if the involved parties are still in good

Read More »
Police Department

Can I Sue the Police Department for Violating My Rights?

The Fourth Amendment of the US Constitution protects citizens from unreasonable search and seizure. The amendment places limits on police conduct. Unfortunately, that doesn’t stop a few cops from crossing the line. This explains why “Can I sue the police department for violating my rights?” is a common question that people who have had negative

Read More »
Scroll to Top